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jakson lee

Chronic insomnia refers to a condition when you stay up late at night because you cannot fall asleep. The patients who have this problem often report getting up in the middle of the night or waking up too early in the morning. The condition is not ideal as not resting for a long time can leave you exhausted and affect your productivity. The main reason for insomniaare stress, neurological problems, depression, physical illness, and mental health disorders. For assisting people living with insomnia, here are some ways to rest well at night. Have a look!

Tips to reset sleep cycle if you have a sleep problem

Exercise: 

Getting physical activity during the day helps treat insomnia. It is so because working out is good for your overall health and helps in improving your sleep quality. It assists in releasing endorphins that make you feel energised and awake. Thus, including a bit of workout every day is recommended. However, when doing so, you must remember that exercising within two hours of bedtime is not ideal as it can have the exact opposite effect.

. Sleep Hygiene:

If you have insomnia, one of the most effective solutions is to fix your sleep hygiene. It means that you should make efforts to stick to a regular sleep schedule. Setting up a consistent wake-up and rest time is a must. Besides, it would help if you also practised habits like not using your phone inside your bedroom or avoiding alcohol around bedtime. Also, the small naps you take during the day should be avoided, as resting in the daytime can cause disruptions to your sleep-wake cycle.

  • Nutrition: 

To improve your sleep quality, paying attention to what you eat or drink is vital. Eating a nutritious diet can keep you healthy and recharged, but heavy diets must be avoided around bedtime. Also, when you are done with your day and ready to fall asleep, you should keep from drinking alcohol or coffee. It is so because consuming caffeine is bad for sleep. Instead, it would help if you tried to drink warm milk or chamomile tea before bedtime. They have a calming effect that makes it easy to fall asleep.

  • Relaxation:

If you have been finding it hard to fall asleep for some days, you should try practising relaxation techniques. You should make your bedroom comfortable, dim the lights, lower the temperature, and control the noise. If you have sleep aids like a white noise machine or earplugs, using them might also prove helpful. Besides, it would help if you hid your alarm clock so you don’t feel tempted to look at it and feel anxious about not being able to fall asleep.

Should I see a doctor to treat sleep apnea?

If you have tried all the sleep apnea remedies, but none is working, it might be time to see a doctor. Your healthcare expert will conduct an exam and ask you questions about your sleep habits. Then, he may suggest treatments for insomnia, like a sleep aid or behavioural therapy to help you get better.

So, these are a few techniques that people dealing with sleep troubles should try to improve their rest quality.


Monika sharma

How much sleep is enough varies from person to person, but most adults need seven to eight hours a night. You don't have to put up with sleepless nights. Simple changes in your daily habits can often help. Let's dive into the article and know more about the reason for insomnia


Symptoms

Insomnia symptoms may include:


  • Difficulty falling asleep at night

  • Waking up during the night

  • Waking up too early

  • Not feeling well-rested after a night's sleep

  • Daytime tiredness or sleepiness

  • Irritability, depression or anxiety

  • Difficulty paying attention, focusing on tasks or remembering

  • Increased errors or accidents

  • Ongoing worries about sleep

  • When to see a doctor


If insomnia makes it hard for you to function during the day, see your doctor to identify the cause of your sleep problem and how it can be treated. If your doctor thinks you could have a sleep disorder, you might be referred to a sleep center for special testing. 


Causes

Insomnia may be the primary problem, or it may be associated with other conditions. Chronic insomnia is usually a result of stress, life events or habits that disrupt sleep. Treating the underlying cause can resolve the insomnia, but sometimes it can last for years.


Common causes of chronic insomnia include:


Stress. Concerns about work, school, health, finances or family can keep your mind active at night, making it difficult to sleep. Stressful life events or trauma — such as the death or illness of a loved one, divorce, or a job loss — also may lead to insomnia.


Travel or work schedule. Your circadian rhythms act as an internal clock, guiding such things as your sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and body temperature. Disrupting your body's circadian rhythms can lead to insomnia. Causes include jet lag from traveling across multiple time zones, working a late or early shift, or frequently changing shifts.

Poor sleep habits. Poor sleep habits include an irregular bedtime schedule, naps, stimulating activities before bed, an uncomfortable sleep environment, and using your bed for work, eating or watching TV. Computers, TVs, video games, smartphones or other screens just before bed can interfere with your sleep cycle.


Eating too much late in the evening. Having a light snack before bedtime is OK, but eating too much may cause you to feel physically uncomfortable while lying down. Many people also experience heartburn, a backflow of acid and food from the stomach into the esophagus after eating, which may keep you awake.


Chronic insomnia may also be associated with medical conditions or the use of certain drugs. Treating the medical condition may help improve sleep, but the insomnia may persist after the medical condition improves.


Additional common causes of insomnia include:


  • Mental health disorders. Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, may disrupt your sleep. Awakening too early can be a sign of depression. Insomnia often occurs with other mental health disorders as well.


  • Medications. Many prescription drugs can interfere with sleep, such as certain antidepressants and medications for asthma or blood pressure. Many over-the-counter medications — such as some pain medications, allergy and cold medications, and weight-loss products — contain caffeine and other stimulants that can disrupt sleep.


  • Medical conditions. Examples of conditions linked with insomnia include chronic pain, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), overactive thyroid, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.


  • Sleep-related disorders. Sleep apnea causes you to stop breathing periodically throughout the night, interrupting your sleep. Restless legs syndrome causes unpleasant sensations in your legs and an almost irresistible desire to move them, which may prevent you from falling asleep.


  • Caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. Coffee, tea, cola and other caffeinated drinks are stimulants. Drinking them in the late afternoon or evening can keep you from falling asleep at night. Nicotine in tobacco products is another stimulant that can interfere with sleep. Alcohol may help you fall asleep, but it prevents deeper stages of sleep and often causes awakening in the middle of the night. 


Insomnia and aging

Insomnia becomes more common with age. As you get older, you may experience:


  • Changes in sleep patterns. Sleep often becomes less restful as you age, so noise or other changes in your environment are more likely to wake you. With age, your internal clock often advances, so you get tired earlier in the evening and wake up earlier in the morning. But older people generally still need the same amount of sleep as younger people do.


  • Changes in activity. You may be less physically or socially active. A lack of activity can interfere with a good night's sleep. Also, the less active you are, the more likely you may be to take a daily nap, which can interfere with sleep at night. 



  • Changes in health. 

Chronic pain from conditions such as arthritis or back problems as well as depression or anxiety can interfere with sleep. Issues that increase the need to urinate during the night ―such as prostate or bladder problems ― can disrupt sleep. sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome become more common with age.

  • More medications. Older people typically use more prescription drugs than younger people do, which increases the chance of insomnia associated with medications. 


These were some of the reasons for insomniathat you should be aware about. 


Monika sharma

How much sleep is enough varies from person to person, but most adults need seven to eight hours a night. You don't have to put up with sleepless nights. Simple changes in your daily habits can often help. Let's dive into the article and know more about the reason for insomnia


Symptoms

Insomnia symptoms may include:


  • Difficulty falling asleep at night

  • Waking up during the night

  • Waking up too early

  • Not feeling well-rested after a night's sleep

  • Daytime tiredness or sleepiness

  • Irritability, depression or anxiety

  • Difficulty paying attention, focusing on tasks or remembering

  • Increased errors or accidents

  • Ongoing worries about sleep

  • When to see a doctor


If insomnia makes it hard for you to function during the day, see your doctor to identify the cause of your sleep problem and how it can be treated. If your doctor thinks you could have a sleep disorder, you might be referred to a sleep center for special testing. 


Causes

Insomnia may be the primary problem, or it may be associated with other conditions. Chronic insomnia is usually a result of stress, life events or habits that disrupt sleep. Treating the underlying cause can resolve the insomnia, but sometimes it can last for years.


Common causes of chronic insomnia include:


Stress. Concerns about work, school, health, finances or family can keep your mind active at night, making it difficult to sleep. Stressful life events or trauma — such as the death or illness of a love, divorce, or a job loss — also may lead to insomnia.


Travel or work schedule. Your circadian rhythms act as an internal clock, guiding such things as your sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and body temperature. Disrupting your body's circadian rhythms can lead to insomnia. Causes include jet lag from traveling across multiple time zones, working a late or early shift, or frequently changing shifts.

Poor sleep habits. Poor sleep habits include an irregular bedtime schedule, naps, stimulating activities before bed, an uncomfortable sleep environment, and using your bed for work, eating or watching TV. Computers, TVs, video games, smartphones or other screens just before bed can interfere with your sleep cycle.


Eating too much late in the evening. Having a light snack before bedtime is OK, but eating too much may cause you to feel physically uncomfortable while lying down. Many people also experience heartburn, a backflow of acid and food from the stomach into the esophagus after eating, which may keep you awake.


Chronic insomnia may also be associated with medical conditions or the use of certain drugs. Treating the medical condition may help improve sleep, but the insomnia may persist after the medical condition improves.


Additional common causes of insomnia include:


  • Mental health disorders. Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, may disrupt your sleep. Awakening too early can be a sign of depression. Insomnia often occurs with other mental health disorders as well.


  • Medications. Many prescription drugs can interfere with sleep, such as certain antidepressants and medications for asthma or blood pressure. Many over-the-counter medications — such as some pain medications, allergy and cold medications, and weight-loss products — contain caffeine and other stimulants that can disrupt sleep.


  • Medical conditions. Examples of conditions linked with insomnia include chronic pain, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), overactive thyroid, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.


  • Sleep-related disorders. Sleep apnea causes you to stop breathing periodically throughout the night, interrupting your sleep. Restless legs syndrome causes unpleasant sensations in your legs and an almost irresistible desire to move them, which may prevent you from falling asleep.


  • Caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. Coffee, tea, cola and other caffeinated drinks are stimulants. Drinking them in the late afternoon or evening can keep you from falling asleep at night. Nicotine in tobacco products is another stimulant that can interfere with sleep. Alcohol may help you fall asleep, but it prevents deeper stages of sleep and often causes awakening in the middle of the night. 


Insomnia and aging

Insomnia becomes more common with age. As you get older, you may experience:


  • Changes in sleep patterns. Sleep often becomes less restful as you age, so noise or other changes in your environment are more likely to wake you. With age, your internal clock often advances, so you get tired earlier in the evening and wake up earlier in the morning. But older people generally still need the same amount of sleep as younger people do.


  • Changes in activity. You may be less physically or socially active. A lack of activity can interfere with a good night's sleep. Also, the less active you are, the more likely you may be to take a daily nap, which can interfere with sleep at night. 



  • Changes in health. 

Chronic pain from conditions such as arthritis or back problems as well as depression or anxiety can interfere with sleep. Issues that increase the need to urinate during the night ―such as prostate or bladder problems ― can disrupt sleep. Sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome become more common with age.

  • More medications. Older people typically use more prescription drugs than younger people do, which increases the chance of insomnia associated with medications. 


These were some of the reasons for insomniathat you should be aware about.

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